Pups between the ages of 9–12 weeks who were permitted to observe their narcotics-detecting mothers at work generally proved more capable at learning the same skills at six months of age than control puppies the same age who were not previously allowed to watch their mothers working.[54] A 2001 study recorded the behaviour of dogs in detour tests, in which a favorite toy or food was placed behind a V-shaped fence. The demonstration of the detour by humans significantly improved the dogs' performance in the trials. The experiments showed that dogs are able to rely on information provided by human action when confronted with a new task. Significantly, they did not copy the exact path of the human demonstrator, but adopted the detour behavior shown by humans to reach their goal.[55] A 1977 experiment by Adler and Adler found that puppies who watched other puppies learn to pull a food cart into their cages by an attached ribbon proved considerably faster at the task when later given the opportunity themselves. At 38 days of age, the demonstrator puppies took an average of 697 seconds to succeed, while the observers succeeded in an average of 9 seconds.[56]
Whilst many of today’s consumers spend most of their online time socialising or working, it’s reassuring for them to know that their favourite promotional pen or coffee mug is close at hand. In the office, workers often use branded promotional merchandise such as personalised USB sticks to move important files from one place to another. On a long commute, a branded bag or case is a handy way to carry a smartphone, laptop, or tablet, and promotional power banks keep all those devices charged. The less tech-savvy among us still use engraved pens, personalised notebooks, and other corporate gifts to build brands and spread corporate goodwill without even realising it.
Play between dogs usually involves several behaviours that are often seen in aggressive encounters, for example, nipping, biting and growling. It is therefore important for the dogs to place these behaviours in the context of play, rather than aggression. Dogs signal their intent to play with a range of behaviours including a "play-bow", "face-pawed" "open-mouthed play face" and postures inviting the other dog to chase the initiator. Similar signals are given throughout the play bout to maintain the context of the potentially aggressive activities.[10]
With extremely small and totally safe doses of different natural material (animal, mineral and herbal), one is able to stimulate the body's immune system against very specific immune body responses (such as conjunctivitis (eye infections); pain, coughing, sneezing, wheezing, and other allergic responses (asthma, bronchitis, discharges); seizures; constipation; diarrhea, etc. The way this works is similar to a vaccine or anti-allergy serum injection.
The motivation for a dog to play with another dog is distinct from that of a dog playing with a human. Dogs walked together with opportunities to play with one another, play with their owners with the same frequency as dogs being walked alone. Dogs in households with two or more dogs play more often with their owners than dogs in households with a single dog, indicating the motivation to play with other dogs does not substitute for the motivation to play with humans.[13]
Animal behaviorists assert that using dominance to modify a behavior can suppress the behavior without addressing the underlying cause of the problem. It can exacerbate the problem and increase the dog's fear, anxiety, and aggression. Dogs that are subjected to repeated threats may react with aggression not because they are trying to be dominant, but because they feel threatened and afraid.[70]
Resource guarding is exhibited by many canines, and is one of the most commonly reported behaviour issues to canine professionals.[50] It is seen when a dog uses specific behaviour patterns so that they can control access to an item, and the patterns are flexible when people are around.[51] If a canine places value on some resource (i.e. food, toys, etc.) they may attempt to guard it from other animals as well as people, which leads to behavioural problems if not treated. The guarding can show in many different ways from rapid ingestion of food to using the body to shield items. It manifests as aggressive behaviour including, but not limited to, growling, barking, or snapping. Some dogs will also resource guard their owners and can become aggressive if the behaviour is allowed to continue. Owners must learn to interpret their dog's body language in order to try to judge the dog's reaction, as visual signals are used (i.e. changes in body posture, facial expression, etc.) to communicate feeling and response.[50] These behaviours are commonly seen in shelter animals, most likely due to insecurities caused by a poor environment. Resource guarding is a concern since it can lead to aggression, but research has found that aggression over guarding can be contained by teaching the dog to drop the item they are guarding.[51]

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Training is also beneficial for your dogs' health as it provides mental stimulation for them and sets the order of dominance in their pack (you, your family and your dog). Dogs are a pack animal and need this order to be well establish to feel safe and secure.  It is also important that your dog understands that you are the top dog.  If your dog thinks that they are top dog this can lead to a lot of problems, particularly if you have children in your family. 
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Whether you're looking for an awesome fitness partner or someone to cuddle up with on the couch, it's important to choose the right breed for your lifestyle. If you're struggling to make a decision, set aside a little time to do some homework. We've provided multiple articles filled with helpful information on breed characteristics, personality, living requirements and history. While each breed has a unique disposition, one is bound to be a perfect fit for you and your lifestyle.
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